Red Sox Ticket Prices, StubHub and Ace Tickets

Back in the day, I used to go to Red Sox games…lots of Red Sox games, as many as 30 or so a year.

In the past couple years, not a game.  In fact, I’ve never taken my two daughters.  Prices obviously enter into this – read this on the pricing thisyear from ESPN

Following an across the board freeze of all ticket prices in 2009, approximately two-thirds of the tickets at Fenway Park will stay at 2009 levels or increase by $2 for the 2010 season and no single price category will increase by more than $5. In 2010, 63% of the tickets at Fenway Park will be $52 or less, with the lowest ticket price remaining at $12.

For many of you, you’re saying, that’s not so bad, go for the $12 tickets.  That’d peg you immediately as someone that has never been in the bleachers at Fenway.  It’s traditionally not a place for your kids…at least not for my kids.

The real rub in my mind is that I can’t get tickets to the games I want, such as the May 7 game against the Yankees without going through a scalper like StubHub or Ace Tickets.  Both have hundreds if not thousands of tickets to that game.  Meanwhile, Redsox.com, the official box office has none…not a single ticket for the game.  This, just ONE DAY after tickets went on sale.

So how’d that happen?

You see in 2007, Stubhub.com signed a 5 year deal with MLB to resell tickets.  On the face of it, the deal was to allow fans to resell their tickets.  Are we honestly to believe that thousands of Red Sox fans waited online Saturday and then changed their mind on Sunday and are now selling their tickets.

No, obviously not.

The big question here has to be asked of the Red Sox: are you providing tickets directly to StubHub?  If so, then that ought to be figured into the average cost of ticket prices.

If this is the case, then the Red Sox and MLB have found an excellent way to increase revenues, without having to face the bad PR of drastically increasing ticket prices.  Also, if this is the case, then both the Red Sox and MLB need a trip to the woodshed.

I fired off an email to the Red Sox box office:

Why is it one day after tickets went on sale, games such as the May 7 Yankees game are unavailable from your site, but StubHub has hundreds if not thousands of tickets.  Do you sell or in any way provide tickets to StubHub?
As a fan, this situation is not acceptable.

What do you think? Should fans be forced to buy their tickets from secondary sources?

Kind of funny to think that StubHub’s motto, “Sold out? Not us…”  when for MLB for this is definitely a Sell Out.

(Note: I contacted the Red Sox via email on Sunday and as of the publish time of this post, have not received any sort of reply).

One thought on “Red Sox Ticket Prices, StubHub and Ace Tickets”

  1. Couldn’t agree more Mark. It is ridiculous. Not only does the front office sell them directly to ACE, but also directly to the street scalpers who have wads and wads of tickets in their hand. I thought redsox.com only let you buy 4 tickets to 2 games at a time… Anyways, I usually end up buying the Standing Room Only tickets. $25 after fees, and they usually release them every game day around noon on the premise they are providing fans a great service by doing so. And then they try to get on your case if one of your feet is beyond the white line of Standing Room…

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