Great LA Times Piece on Revision3

I’ve said it before – they’re changing the way broadcast media is done…check out the LA Times piece on  Revision3.

nd so far, people are. Revision3 was started in 2005 by Kevin Rose and Jay Adelson, the guys behind Digg.com, the popular site where users vote on the best news stories of the day. Rose co-hosts the show “Diggnation,” a weekly rundown of the site’s top stories, which Revision3 beams out to about 200,000 viewers per 40-minute episode. He has become a model for the kind of smart celebrity the technology scene loves — people who are entertaining while the camera’s rolling, and enterprising when it isn’t.

“What’s working are these host-driven shows,” said Revision3 Chief Executive Jim Louderback. “The ones where you’ve got an engaging host with a proven ability to aggregate social networks around them online, and who are great at talking about their passions.”

I don’t miss a single episode of Tekzilla and Systm – great shows, and they work very well downloaded right onto my Iphone – I no longer fear waiting rooms.  They are there when I’m ready to watch them – utterly convenient, as opposed to traditional broadcast

The real thing to get out of this article is this: online video is the place to be right now.  The rules are being written and the frontiers are being explored.  Look at the stuff that Leo Laporte’s doing at Twitlive.tv and definitely take a very close look at Revision3 – this is the next wave and it’s happening now.

(Disclosure: Revision3 CEO Jim Louderback is a friend from college – but that had nothing with my decision to run this post, although I am extremely happy for him and the Revision3 crew…)

CBS Talks About Outsourcing Reporting to CNN

CBS News in Talks to Outsource to CNNThis could be the beginning of the end for primary source news. Actually Reuters experimented by moving many editorial positions to India a couple years ago. In this case, for CBS to basically give up and consider hiring CNN to do the work means yet another hard blow to the news industry.

I’ve got more coming up tomorrow on this issue (at least tangentally) but for now, I’ll just say this: when we remove the primary sources of news, we don’t have any news left.

Of course, the other side of the coin is that perhaps this is just a shaking out of the weak sisters, which is a good thing in any industry (as long as you aren’t one of those getting shaken out).